Showing posts with label termites. Show all posts
Showing posts with label termites. Show all posts

Thursday, 3 October 2013

Pests that require Control!

Pest (organism)



Carpet beetle larvae damaging a specimen of Sceliphron destillatorius in an entomological collection
pest is "a plant or animal detrimental to humans or human concerns (as agriculture or livestock production)";[1] alternative meanings include organisms that cause nuisance and epidemic disease associated with high mortality (specifically: plague). In its broadest sense, a pest is a competitor of humanity.[2] In the past, the term might have been used for detrimental animals only, thus for example, causing confusion where the generic term 'pesticide' meant 'insecticide' to some people. It is any living organism which is invasive or prolific, detrimental, troublesome, noxious, destructive, a nuisance to either plants or animals, human or human concerns, livestock, human structures, wild ecosystems, etc. It is a loosely defined term, often overlapping with the related terms vermin, weed, plant and animal parasites and pathogens. It is possible for an organism to be a pest in one setting but beneficial, domesticated or acceptable in another.[edit]

Pests often occur in high densities, making the damage they do even more detrimental
Often animals are derided as pests as they cause damage to agriculture by feeding on crops or parasitising livestock, such as codling moth on apples, orboll weevil on cotton. An animal could also be a pest when it causes damage to a wild ecosystem or carries germs within human habitats. Examples of these include those organisms which vector human disease, such as rats and fleas which carry the plague disease, mosquitoes which vector malaria, and ticks which carry Lyme disease.
The term pest may be used to refer specifically to harmful animals but is also often taken to mean all harmful organisms including weeds, plant pathogenic fungi and virusesPesticides are chemicals and other agents (e.g. beneficial micro-organisms) that are used to control or protect other organisms from pests. The related term vermin has much overlap with pest, but generally only includes those creatures that are seen to be vectors of diseases.
It is possible for an animal to be a pest in one setting but beneficial or domesticated in another (for example, European rabbits introduced to Australiacaused ecological damage beyond the scale they inflicted in their natural habitat). Many weeds (plant pests) are also seen as useful under certain conditions, for instance Patterson's curse is often valued as food for honeybees and as a wildflower, even though it can poison livestock.
The term "plant pest" has a very specific definition in terms of the International Plant Protection Convention and phytosanitary measures worldwide. A pest is any species, strain or biotype of plant, animal, or pathogenic agent injurious to plants or plant products.[3]
Plants may be considered pests if an invasive species. Any prolific animal or plant may be considered pests.
The greatest importance as pests (in the order of economic importance) are insectsmitesnematodes and gastropods.[4]

Invertebrate pests

Insects


Caterpillars cause crop damage

Termites cause structural damage

Nematodes[edit]

Parasites[edit]

Gastropods[edit]

Some slugs are pests in both agriculture and gardens. Their significance is increasing drastically.[4] Deroceras reticulatum is a worldwide distributed slug pest.[4] Local importance slug pests include: Deroceras spp.,[4] Milax spp.,[4] Tandonia sp.,[4] Limax spp.,[4] Arion spp.[4] and some species ofVeronicellidae:[4] Veronicella sloanei.[5]
Land snail pests include:
Freshwater snail pests include:

Plant pathogens

Plant pests

Seagulls steal human food

Mammals

Birds

Thursday, 8 August 2013

Spring Pest Control Tips

spring pest control london ontario
Spring clean-up to prevent insects from entering home
Homeowners are likely to start finding unwanted pests in and around their homes as we transition from the colder wet winter months to warmer spring months. The following are some simple steps homeowners can take to reduce their risk of pest control problems:
Pest Control Tips In the Kitchen
- Store food in airtight containers. Open packages of pasta, rice, and baking goods (i.e. flour, oatmeal, cornmeal) should be placed in the freezer and frozen for 72 hours, then placed in airtight containers, or thrown away to reduce the chance of insects infesting the pantry.
- Always wipe down sticky containers. Bottles of sticky substances such as syrup and other sauces or condiments should be wiped down with warm soapy water to reduce the chance of ant infestation.
- Throw away spoiled food right away. Items such as old potatoes, onions, and other vegetables should be checked for spoilage to avoid fruit fly infestation or attack from ants, crickets, earwigs, etc.
- Freeze candy and chocolate. Put leftover holiday candy and other treats in the freezer to avoid attracting insects into your pantry.
Pest Control Tips Throughout the House
- Clean your doors and windows. Thoroughly vacuum and clean window and sliding door tracks to help prevent outside invaders such as carpet beetles, earwigs, silverfish and spiders.
- Don’t let the bed bugs bite! After house guests leave, carefully inspect closets, drawers, and beds/sofas for bed bugs that may have inadvertently been brought in. Also, after you travel, carefully clean or vacuum all luggage inside and out, and then store it in tightly sealed plastic garbage bags.
- Store away wool and fur-trimmed clothing. During warm weather months, wash and store away wool and fur-trimmed or -lined clothing in sealed containers or plastic bags to reduce the chance of moth or carpet beetle activity. READ MORE