Showing posts with label pest control london ontario. Show all posts
Showing posts with label pest control london ontario. Show all posts

Tuesday, 16 February 2016

WHAT PESTS SHOULD YOU EXPECT TO SEE INSIDE YOUR HOME THIS WINTER

Across the country, cold weather and heavy snowfalls are not only forcing people indoors, but also driving rodents, ants, spiders, raccoons, and others to find food, water, and shelter inside the house. To homeowners, that spells trouble for more than one reason: aside from being a nuisance, indoor pests can endanger the structural integrity of the house, contaminate foodstuffs, and spread disease. Here are five critters you should expect to see inside your house this winter and some tips on how to recognize their presence.

1) Rodents
Could you think of anything grosser than sharing your Christmas dinner with the filthy, disease-carrying rats that can cause major property damage and put your family’s health at risk? As winter closes in, rodents will enter homes more often, usually squeezing through holes the size of a quarter or climbing up drain pipes. Aside from the minor damage they cause by gnawing on furnishings and building materials, exposure to their urine and droppings can transmit serious diseases such as salmonella, hantavirus, and infection.
Signs of infestation: smell of urine, teeth marks, droppings, greasy fur marks, and gnawing on wiring and other objects.

2) Ants
Ants enter homes to forage for food, which is scarce especially during cold winters and dry summers. Left alone to reproduce, a few ants will rapidly turn into thousands and end up all over the house. The pavement ant is the most common ant during winter, typically nesting in the soil under sidewalks, concrete slabs, and asphalt driveways. They can easily gain access inside the house through cracks in the foundation blocks, expansion joints, weep holes, waste pipes, and other tiny crevices. Unlike other ant species, they do not cause structural damage to the house, but can surely be a pain in the neck when they start claiming all things sweet in the food cabinet, from sugar and fruit to any kind of syrups.
Signs of infestation: sightings of worker pavement ants and small piles of excavated materials inside the house or nearby.

3) Spiders
After gorging on the seemingly endless supply of bugs available over the summer, house spiders are already heading indoors looking for shelter and preferably a mate. Now, although experts have confirmed that most house spiders are completely harmless and incapable to pierce through the skin of humans, their sight is still unnerving, always weaving their web in some dark corner of the house waiting for their prey. Large indoor populations indicate the presence of equally large insect populations, typically ants, flies, and woodlice, which serve as their prey.
Signs of infestation: sightings of spiders and their webs in dark corners, crevices, moist environments, closets, storage boxes, etc.

4) Cockroaches
If you were to ask yourself: “Do cockroaches die in winter?”, the answer would probably not going to please you. Not only do cockroaches survive the freezing temperatures of the cold season, but they do so by seeking shelter as close to humans as they possibly can. And keeping them away is definitely a challenge. In their quest to find starchy foods, meats, and anything else organic, they can squirm through the smallest of openings and crawl through tiny gaps around doors and windows. They usually nest around the kitchen and bathroom, proliferate quickly, and are almost impossible to eliminate without the help of a professional.
Signs of infestation: oily or musty odors, feces resembling coffee grounds or black pepper, shed skins, egg cases, and cockroach sightings.

5) Wildlife
As if rodents in your kitchen and cockroaches in your bathroom weren’t bad enough, squirrels and raccoons can easily find their way inside your house and take up residence in the attic. Both raccoons and squirrels are excellent climbers, and they will gladly accept the warm and dry shelter provided by your attic during the cold season. They do, however, need food and water, so you’ll probably going to see a lot of them coming and going in the attic, where they will gain access via chimneys, vents, roof holes, and other openings.
Signs of infestation: nocturnal noises (growls, cries, chirps, and others) and sightings of the animals in the attic, as they climb onto the roof, or at the trashcan.

As you can see, winter is not a time to let your guard down as far as pests are concerned. They may be less active during the cold season, but that doesn’t mean they are going away completely. Quite the contrary: fall and winter are prime pest invasion periods, when the warmth and comfort of your home will probably bring in an influx of bugs, so make sure you are ready to fight back by calling your local pest control professional as soon as you notice the first signs of infestation.

Tuesday, 10 November 2015

Christmas tree cultivation | Pest Control London Ontario

Christmas tree cultivation is an agricultural, forestry, and horticultural occupation which involves growing pine, spruce, and fir trees specifically for use as Christmas trees.
The first Christmas tree farm was established in 1901, but most consumers continued to obtain their trees from forests until the 1930s and 1940s. Christmas tree farming was once seen only as a viable alternative for low-quality farmland, but that perception has changed within the agriculture industry. For optimum yield and quality, land should be flat or gently rolling and relatively free of debris and undergrowth.
A wide variety of pine and fir species are grown as Christmas trees, although a handful of varieties stand out in popularity. In the United States, Douglas-fir, Scots Pine and Fraser Fir all sell well. Nordmann Fir and Norway Spruce sell well in the United Kingdom, the latter being popular throughout Europe. Like all conifers, Christmas trees are vulnerable to a range of pests.
The final stage of cultivation, harvesting, is carried out in a number of ways; one of the more popular methods is the pick-your-own tree farm, where customers are allowed to roam the farm, select their tree, and cut it down themselves. Other farmers cultivate potted trees, with balled roots, which can be replanted after Christmas and used again the following year[edit]History
The practice of cultivating evergreens specifically to sell as Christmas trees dates back to 1901, when a 25,000 tree Norway Spruce farm was sown near Trenton, New Jersey.[1] The commercial market for Christmas trees had started fifty years earlier when a farmer from the Catskill Mountains brought trees into New York City to sell.[2] Despite these pioneering efforts, most people still obtained wild-grown Christmas trees from forests into the 1930s and 1940s.[3] More trees were grown in plantations after World War II, and by the 1950s farmers were shearing and pruning trees to meet customer demands. The Christmas tree market burgeoned through the 1960s and 1970s, but from the late 1980s onward prices and the market for natural Christmas trees declined. In the early 21st century, nearly 98 percent of all natural (non-artificial) Christmas trees sold worldwide were grown on tree farms.[4]

Cultivation

Land and climate

pest control london ontario
 
 
This Christmas tree farm in southern Virginia is situated in a gently rolling valley.
Christmas tree farms are best located on relatively level land which is free of obstructions. In the past, Christmas tree farmers established their plantations on less desirable agricultural plots or “wastelands of agriculture”.[5] However, emphasis in modern Christmas tree farming has shifted toward the production of higher-quality trees, increasing land quality expectations as well.[5] Indeed, some species of tree, such as the Fraser Fir, are unable to grow on low-quality, marginal farmland.[6] Flat or gently rolling land is preferred to that with steep slopes and inclines, which is prone to erosion and fluctuations in fertility. Noticeable obstructions, such as rocks, fences or significant underbrush, are also undesirable.[5]
pest control london ontario
 
 
This Christmas tree farm in Iowa is located on flat ground and has well-mowed rows between the trees.
Like all crops and plants, Christmas trees require a specific set of nutrients to thrive.[7] There are 16 elements crucial for growth; of those, three are obtained through air and water: hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen. Nitrogen,phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, boron, copper, chlorine, manganese, molybdenum, iron, and zinc are obtained from the soil. If the necessary elements are not available in the local soil, nutritious fertilizers are used.[7] Other important soil considerations include pH and drainage.[8] Certain types of soil are preferable, depending on the type of tree. Pine trees are usually better adapted to a sandy or sandy loam soil,[9] while White Spruce trees and fir trees, such as the Douglas-fir, prefer fine-texture loams and clay loam soils.[9] Some trees grow well in all types of soil, but in any case, the land must be well-drained for a Christmas tree farm to have a chance of thriving.[9]
The weather, as with other agricultural endeavors, plays a key outcome in the yield of a Christmas tree farm. Severe cold in the winter and extreme hot and dry conditions during and after harvest can cause irreparable damage to the crop.[10] Early snow can make
both harvesting and shipping trees difficult or impossible.[10]

Labor and equipment

Christmas tree farming is a labor-intensive process. Depending on the quality of the land, bulldozing may need to be undertaken prior to planting, in order to remove obstacles such as large trees or rocks.[11] If the volume of undergrowth requires it, the soil may be tilled; tilling can help remove any debris remaining after tree or weed removal. Both woody plants and herbaceous weeds must be controlled prior to planting; this is most often done by application of a chemical herbicide.[11] In addition, some types of fertilizers must be introduced into the soil prior to planting.[11] The work done before planting tree seedlings plays an important role in the overall success of a Christmas tree crop.[10]
After the trees are in the ground, work on the crop continues. Animal pests (especially insects) and diseases must be monitored and controlled, and weed growth must also be minimized. Many species of pine and fir require pruning and shearing two to four years after planting to maintain the classic Christmas tree shape.[10] Late or omitted pruning can result in trees that are unmarketable due to large gaps in needle coverage. Some species of pine, such as the Scots Pine, are susceptible to dormant season “yellowing”, which is generally countered with a green dye or paint.[10][12]
The outlay of money on equipment varies greatly. Some items commonly found on Christmas tree farms are insecticide sprayers, tractors, and shaper sheers.[13] Mechanized planters, at a cost of about US$4,000, are not essential but a work-saving luxury for farmers.[13] Farmers can purchase seedlings, the lifeblood of a Christmas tree farm, from nurseries. One farmer in Oregon purchased seedlings for between US$200–300 per 1,000 plants. The farmer, a wholesaler, sold his final products for about $20 each; after the cost of the trees and other expenses, a profit of $2–3 per tree.[13]

Trees

pest control london ontario
 
 
Fraser Fir (cone and foliage pictured) is a popular species of Christmas tree in both the United States and Great Britain.
The best-selling species in the North American market are Scots Pine, Douglas-fir, Noble Fir, Balsam Fir, Fraser Fir, Virginia Pine, and Eastern White Pine, although other types of trees are also grown and sold.[4][14] In Alabama, for example, types of trees grown for use as Christmas trees include Eastern White Pine, Redcedar, Virginia Pine, Leyland Cypress, and Arizona Cypress.[15] In Florida, the Sand Pine and Spruce Pine are among the 20,000 grown in the state each year.[16]
pest control london ontario
 
 
Norway Spruce is a popular Christmas tree species in Europe.
In Great Britain, Nordmann Fir is a popular species, largely due to its needle-holding qualities.[17][18] Other popular trees in Britain are Norway Spruce, Serbian Spruce, and Scots Pine, the last of which is slightly rarer;[18] it has sharp needles which do not shed easily.[17]
In the U.S. Pacific Northwest, a major Christmas tree growing region, Douglas-fir has always been the primary species grown.[19] A full one-half of all trees produced in the Pacific Northwest are Douglas-fir.[19] Douglas-firs typically take five to seven years before they are mature enough to sell as Christmas trees.[19] Also common in the region are Noble Fir, a tree which commands a higher price than Douglas-fir, and Grand Fir, which accounts for about 10 percent of the annual harvest in the Northwest.[19] Other species collectively account for only 3–5 percent of the total Northwest harvest.[19]
In North America, Fraser Fir, grown in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina, has been called the “Cadillac of Christmas Trees” as well as the “most popular and most valuable of Christmas tree species”.[20] In the southern United States, Virginia Pine is a popular Christmas tree species.[21] In Canada, White Pine, White Spruce, Scots Pine, Blue Spruce and Fraser Fir are commonly cultivated.[22] In the province of Ontario, Scots Pine has always dominated both the domestic and export markets.[22] Other regions of the world also have different favorites when it comes to natural Christmas trees, and Christmas tree farms reflect these; In Europe, Norway Spruce is popular.[21]

Pests, disease and weeds

Main article: Christmas tree pests and weeds
pest control london ontario
 
 
An adult Balsam woolly adelgid, a major pest in the Christmas tree industry
Many of the conifer species cultivated face infestations and death from such pests as the Balsam woolly adelgid, other adelgids and aphids. Invasive insect species, such as the pine shoot beetle and the gypsy moth, also threaten Christmas tree crops.[23] Christmas trees are also vulnerable to fungal pathogens, resulting in such illnesses as root rot, and, in California, Washington, Oregon and British Columbia sudden oak death.[24] Douglas-fir trees are especially vulnerable to infections from plant pathogens such as R. pseudotsugaeand Rhabdocline weiriiR. weirii affects only Douglas-fir trees.[25][26] The pathogen often makes Douglas-fir trees unsaleable as Christmas trees and heavily affects the Christmas tree farming industry.[25]
Mammals such as deer, gophers and ground squirrels are also threats to Christmas tree crops, due to the damage they cause to roots and buds. Certain species of birds are also considered pests, including the Pine Grosbeak, which feeds on conifer buds,[27] usually affecting Scots Pine but also affecting Eastern White Pine and Red Pine, as well as spruce trees.[28] Herbaceous weeds, as well as woody plants, also compete with Christmas tree crops for water and nutrients, necessitating control methods including mowing, chemical herbicide use, and tilling.

Quality

USDA Christmas Tree Grades[29]
GradeRequirements[30]
U.S. PremiumFresh, clean, healthy, heavy density, one minor defect allowed[31]
U.S. No. 1Fresh, fairly clean, healthy, medium density, two minor defects allowed[32]
U.S. No. 2Fresh, fairly clean, healthy, light density,
three minor defects allowed[33]
Christmas tree quality grades have been in place since 1965 in Ontario, Canada, and were included under the provincial Farm Products Grades and Sales Act.[22] While the grades in Ontario are law, in the United States the grading system is not mandated. In fact, it is common for U.S. growers to develop their own grading systems.[34] The grading systems established by individual jurisdictions are often in the spirit of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) grading scheme, even if they are not entirely based upon them.[35] The Department of Agriculture’s United States Standards for Grades of Christmas Trees took effect on October 30, 1989, covering “sheared or unsheared trees of the coniferous species which are normally marketed as Christmas trees”.[29]

Harvest

See also: Christmas tree production
pest control london ontario
 
 
Customers, armed with a saw, at a typical “choose-and-cut” Christmas tree farm
Christmas trees can be harvested and marketed in different ways. Some operations are known as “choose-and-cut” or pick-your-own farms, which allow customers to walk through the planted land, select their Christmas tree and cut down themselves.[8] Wholesale operations are more labor-intensive because they usually require the farmer to complete tasks such as baling, cutting, moving the trees to a roadside pick-up, and loading the harvest. In addition, this work must be completed during a very short period in November.[8] Growers also harvest trees by digging and balling the root and selling the trees as nursery stock or as live, reusable Christmas trees. This last option allows trees to be harvested earlier than the usual six to ten year period required to grow a mature Christmas tree.[8]
pest control london ontario
 
 
Customers haul their own purchases off-site at choose-and-cut farms.
Larger farms began using helicopters to move tree harvests during the 1980s.[3] One 1,200-acre (490 ha) farm in Oregon lacked road access, so it began using helicopters to
move up to 200,000 Christmas trees per year.[36] Helicopters reduce the amount of time between harvesting and market, cutting it from up to two weeks down to as little as three days.[36]
Not all natural Christmas trees harvested are grown on plantations. In British Columbia, Canada, for example, most of the 900,000 trees harvested for use as Christmas trees came from native pine and fir stands.[37] The British Columbia Ministry of Forests and Ranges allows any resident of the province to cut a Christmas tree for free from Crown Lands, provided the individual receive prior permission in writing from a Forest Officer.[38] In the United States, the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management offer permits for individual tree cutting on government land, mostly within the National Forest system.[39]

Farmers

The people who operate Christmas tree farms range from full-time growers to part-time farmers. One farmer in Minnesota, who began planting Christmas trees in 1967, gave his trees away for free from his modest 1-acre (4,000 m2) farm for ten years before establishing a tree farming business.[40] Other farmers started growing Christmas trees as a supplemental income for retirement or college funds,[41][42] or they worked farms that were not originally established as Christmas tree farms.[43][44]
Various national growers’ associations have been founded in Christmas tree producing nations. In the United Kingdom, the British Christmas Tree Growers Association is a trade association open to membership from Christmas tree farmers in Great Britain and Northern Ireland.[45] The National Christmas Tree Association serves a similar function in the United States.[46]

Environmental effect

In the United States, the National Christmas Tree Association (NCTA) promotes the environmental benefits of live Christmas trees over the competing artificial alternative.[47] The NCTA stated that every acre of Christmas trees in production produced the daily oxygen requirement for 18 people; with 500,000 acres (200,000 ha) in production in the U.S. alone, that amounts to oxygen for 9 million people per day.[47] The NCTA also stated that the farms help to stabilize the soil, protect water supplies and provide wildlife habitat.[47] In addition, the industry points to the reduction of carbon dioxide through Christmas tree farming.[48] An independent Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study, conducted by a firm of experts in sustainable development, states that a natural tree will generate 3.1 kg of greenhouse gases whereas the artificial tree will produce 8.1 kg per year.[49]
A 1998 report from the Michigan State University Agricultural Experiment Station predicted increasing environmental concerns about tree production and use as one possible reason people may favor artificial trees in the future. The report cited the use of fertilizers and pesticides and increasing concerns regarding tree disposal as the chief elements in its prediction.[50] Critics of tree farming have raised the concerns highlighted in the 1998 report, as well as other issues, such as the effect that large-scale tree farming operations have on biodiversity.[48] Pesticide use on Christmas tree farms is one of the main concerns of environmentalists;[48][51] fir trees are vulnerable to a wide array of pests and diseases which requires the use of pesticides and other chemicals including the widely-used herbicide glyphosate (brand name Roundup).[48] Glyphosate

Thursday, 2 July 2015

Lots of Pests, Many Solutions

Sawyer Pest Management is an industry leader in the development and implementation of proactive pest management solutions for residential homes, cottages and commercial facilities.
Our mission is to provide quality services that exceed industry safety and environmental standards while providing guaranteed solutions for each and every service we perform.

Sawyer Pest Management provides One-Pest, Home Protection and Home Protection Plus services to residential homes and cottages in addition to providing weekly and monthly inspection, monitoring and treatment programs to commercial facilities.

Sawyer Pest Management specializes in providing insect, rodent and bird-related solutions. We work with each of our clients to develop a solution for their specific pest and budget. Sawyer Pest Management incorporates Integrated Pest Management (IPM) principles prior to initiating or recommending a service program.  Some of the things Sawyer Pest Management will take into consideration prior to completing a pest management service include:

1. The type of pest requiring control: Different pests have different weaknesses; what works well on one pest might not work well on another type. Sawyer will select the safest, most effective product, material or control technique for the insect or rodent requiring control.

2. Time of year: Some pests, including carpenter ants, rats, mice, cockroaches, pavement ants, silverfish, centipedes, bedbugs, fleas, spiders and cockroaches, are active in the spring, summer, fall and winter. Other pest species, such as starlings, sparrows, exterior spiders, wasps, carpenter bees, earwigs, crickets and box elder beetles, are more seasonal in nature. The time of year will dictate whether an interior, exterior or interior/exterior service is required to provide control.

3. The construction type of the home, cottage or business: The age of the property, construction style, and materials used in the original construction or during renovations will dictate the type of control program or materials required to gain control. Cottages with a crawlspace will require a different service than a home with a finished basement and a well-insulated property will require a different service than an un-insulated property.

There is no one service solution or product for every pest type or situation.
Sawyer Pest Management is licensed by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and is insured. Each of its service representatives is a fully licensed Structural Exterminator, fully trained and competent in the services they provide. Sawyer Pest Management does not employ unlicensed service technicians. 

Sawyer Pest Management is proud to provide service programs in the communities of London, Melbourne, Ingersoll, Aylmer, Port Stanley, Strathroy, St.Thomas, Parkhill, Grand Bend, Bayfield, Exeter, Lucan and St. Maryshttp://www.themomonline.com/blog/lots-of-pests-many-solutions

Wednesday, 3 December 2014

Winter Pests and Bugs



pest control london ontario
 
elisfanclub/Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0
 
There's no doubt that summer is prime pest season. Insects are abundant; flies and mosquitoes buzz freely in through opening doors and windows; and wildlife, including rats and mice, actively roam around grassy lawns and open fields.
But, as too many too often learn, such pests don't go completely inactive in the winter. In fact, when it is cold and wet or snowy outside, pests are even more likely to seek the warmth and shelter of the indoors. Some of most common winter pests and guidance for control include:  

  1. Winged Carpenter Ants - Flying ants in the home are rarely a good sign, and this is particularly true if they are seen indoors during the winter. Finding a winged ant or two indoors during the summer does not necessarily mean there is a problem, but if winged ants are seen in the home during the winter months, there is a strong likelihood that there is a carpenter ant nest within the structure.

  1. Cluster Fly - Homeowners generally expect to have to swat a fly or two in the house during the summer months. With family members constantly filing in and out; doors being propped while groceries are carried in; windows opened to screens that need mending, it is generally more likely that a fly will get in than that all will be kept out.
 
  1. Mice - A wily, curious creature, the house mouse is the most common of home-invading mice. Cute, perhaps, in a cage in the pet store, but not so cute when it decides to make your house its home.
 
  1. Rats - Two species of rodents are most common in the U.S.: the Norway rat and the roof rat. Along with the common house mouse, both rats are believed to have been brought to the U.S. aboard ships bound for the New World in the 17th and 18th centuries.
 
  1. Bed bugs - For decades, the saying “Sleep tight, don’t let the bed bugs bite” was a fairly meaningless lights-out phrase for kids in the U.S. But within the last few years, bed bugs have reappeared, causing sleepless nights for homeowners and hotel owners alike.
 
  1. Fruit Fly - The fruit fly is one of the most common, and one of the smallest flies found in the home. It is often unknowingly brought into the home on fresh fruits and vegetables
 
  1. Moth Fly - Moth flies (Psychoda sp.) are a common small fly generally seen buzzing around drains - thus its common name of drain fly. Though it causes no real damage, its high numbers can cause it to become a nuisance pest in or around the home.
 
  1. Spiders - There are more than 35,000 known spider species in the world, with only about a tenth (3,500) of those appearing in the U.S. and often only one tenth (350) of those in any single region. In general, spiders are beneficial creatures, preying and feeding on flies, crickets, mites, and other household and yard pests. Most are completely harmless to humans. But when they get into your home, they can definitely be a nuisance.
 
  1. Overwintering Insects - Any discussion of insects over the winter is likely to elicit the term "overwintering." While its meaning can be as simple as indicating how an insect (or other animal or plant) spends its time over the winter, it more frequently is used to refer to a sort of hibernation undertaken by insects in order to survive the cold temperatures.
 
  1. Firewood Pests - A wood-burning stove or fireplace can bring a great deal of warmth, comfort and pleasing aesthetics into a home. However the firewood that is brought into the home for that fire can also bring with it a number of household pests.
 

Prevent Home Invasion

 

  As described in Tips for Control of Firewood Insects (described above), you can prevent home invasion of pests, and there are methods to control them if they do get in: Rodent Control - The best method of rodent control is prevention through sanitation and exclusion. But these clever creatures can enter a home or building through spaces much smaller than the seeming roundness of their bodies and they are constantly seeking food, water, and shelter. Thus, it is important to keep an eye out for signs of mice and rats and understand control methods. Pest Proof Your Home - If you are like almost half the households questioned in a University of Kentucky survey, a single cockroach in your home would cause you to pull out a can of bug spray or call a pest control professional. Get Rid of Ants - To solve an ant problem, you need to first eliminate the ones you don’t see in order to get rid of the ones you do. Ants are very social insects with very strict hierarchies.  

Calling a Professional

 

  Sometimes it is just better to call on a professional. When that is the case, there are: Top 12 Considerations in Hiring a Pest Control Professional. Sometimes it is better to hire a pest control professional than to try to do it yourself. This is particularly true if the pest problem is ongoing, if the infestation has become large, or if the products needed for control are only authorized for use by certified professionals.  

Wednesday, 3 September 2014

London Ontario Pest Control

As a leading specialist, Ryan Sawyer graduated from the Environmental Pest Management program at Sir Sandford Fleming College in 1997. Since graduating, he has been employed in the pest control industry in the areas of service, technical support/quality assurance and management. In addition to working in the pest control industry since 1997, he has kept himself current by attending conferences, seminars and courses related to the pest control industry. Some examples of this continued training are:

  • Successful completion of the American Institute of Baking (AIB) Food Safety and Hygiene course
  • Successful completion of the Middlesex London Health Unit’s Food Safety Food Handler Certification Program
  • Obtained Copesan Services Signature Care Program Designation for Food Processing Facilities as an IPM Specialist
  • Completed training and attained certification as a Certified Bird Control Specialist
  • Successful completion of the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) Pest Management in Food Plants Exam
  • Received a certification of excellence from Quality Pro Canada by meeting the Quality Pro Canada requirements and achieving the mark of excellence in Pest Management

In addition to completing the above list of continued education, he currently holds the following Exterminators Licences issued by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment:

  • Structural Exterminator’s License
  • Fumigation General Exterminator’s License
  • Mosquito/Biting Flies Exterminator’s License
  • Landscape Exterminator’s License




While employed in the pest control industry Ryan has serviced, developed, implemented and audited professional environmental Pest Management Programs (EPM) and Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs. These programs are effective at reducing or eliminating pesticide usage, while maintaining a pest-free environment for Residential, commercial, Industrial and Agricultural clients. Ryan has extensive experience developing individualized programs that use a variety of methods and tools which identify conditions conducive to pest development. These programs allow for the early detection of activity and allow for the elimination of early stage pest activity, and/ or eliminate heavy infestations through clean-out programs.
Ryan and Sawyer Pest Management will work with you to customize and implement a program that protects your home or business from pest infestation. We Service; London Ontario, Strathroy, Ingersoll, Dorchester, Exeter, Lucan, Goderich, Grandbend, and Bayfield Ontario

Thursday, 10 July 2014

Pest Control for London Ontario, St. Thomas and Grand Bend Ontario plus surrounding towns!

Pest Control Service Areas

Sawyer Pest Management′s team is ready to help you take control of your home. We specialize in Pest control London Ontario, pest management services, pest identification, pest extermination, and we service all of London Ontario plus surrounding areas for pests such as St. Thomas, Strathroy, Ingersoll, Dorchester, Exeter, Lucan, Goderich, Bayfield, Ailsa Craig, Appin, Arkona, Aylmer, Beachville, Belmont, Clinton, Dashwood, Dutton, Glencoe, Grand Bend, Hensall, Ilderton, Kirkton, Komoka, London, Melbourne, Mitchell, Mount Brydges, Nairn, Parkhill, Port Franks, Port Stanley, St. Marys, Seaforth, Springfield, Tillsonburg, Watford, Woodstock, Zurich. The best at Pest Control and complete pest control packages are provided to get rid of bugs. 519-661-6886.

Friday, 7 February 2014

What's the best way to keep pests out of my home?

In the classic 1995 comedy, "Houseguest," stand-up comic Sinbad plays a con man on the run from Mafiosi to whom he owes money. To lay low until the heat's off, Sinbad poses as a long-lost friend to an unwitting suburbanite played by the late Phil Hartman, moving in as a houseguest. Hilarity ensues as Sinbad charms the family with his antics. He goes from welcomed houseguest to unwelcome house pest, once the Mafia men located him at the family's home [source: Rotten Tomatoes].
Pests of the insect and rodent variety aren't always quite so obvious; however, they can be just as irritating. After all, what's worse than waking in the morning and finding that a tick has burrowed into your skin or that a rat has eaten all of your cereal?
pest control london ontario
There are plenty of ways to rid your home of critters -- from raccoons to cockroaches -- once they've set up house in your domain. Exterminators appear to be the preferred choice among Americans: The pest control industry in the United States pulls in about $7 billion in combined revenue each year [source: Hoovers]. While exterminators usually come armed with poisonous chemicals that are deadly to pests, these chemicals can possibly be harmful to you. One 2003 study by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) found that the average person has at least 13 different pesticides in his or her body, some of which have been linked to health problems like cancer and nerve damage [source: CDC].
But what alternatives are there to pest control? Aside from calling in the exterminator, how can you keep pests out of your home? Actually, a green alternative can be the best course of action. Learn about a very green way to keep your home pest-free on the next page.

Read More

Thursday, 3 October 2013

Pests that require Control!

Pest (organism)



Carpet beetle larvae damaging a specimen of Sceliphron destillatorius in an entomological collection
pest is "a plant or animal detrimental to humans or human concerns (as agriculture or livestock production)";[1] alternative meanings include organisms that cause nuisance and epidemic disease associated with high mortality (specifically: plague). In its broadest sense, a pest is a competitor of humanity.[2] In the past, the term might have been used for detrimental animals only, thus for example, causing confusion where the generic term 'pesticide' meant 'insecticide' to some people. It is any living organism which is invasive or prolific, detrimental, troublesome, noxious, destructive, a nuisance to either plants or animals, human or human concerns, livestock, human structures, wild ecosystems, etc. It is a loosely defined term, often overlapping with the related terms vermin, weed, plant and animal parasites and pathogens. It is possible for an organism to be a pest in one setting but beneficial, domesticated or acceptable in another.[edit]

Pests often occur in high densities, making the damage they do even more detrimental
Often animals are derided as pests as they cause damage to agriculture by feeding on crops or parasitising livestock, such as codling moth on apples, orboll weevil on cotton. An animal could also be a pest when it causes damage to a wild ecosystem or carries germs within human habitats. Examples of these include those organisms which vector human disease, such as rats and fleas which carry the plague disease, mosquitoes which vector malaria, and ticks which carry Lyme disease.
The term pest may be used to refer specifically to harmful animals but is also often taken to mean all harmful organisms including weeds, plant pathogenic fungi and virusesPesticides are chemicals and other agents (e.g. beneficial micro-organisms) that are used to control or protect other organisms from pests. The related term vermin has much overlap with pest, but generally only includes those creatures that are seen to be vectors of diseases.
It is possible for an animal to be a pest in one setting but beneficial or domesticated in another (for example, European rabbits introduced to Australiacaused ecological damage beyond the scale they inflicted in their natural habitat). Many weeds (plant pests) are also seen as useful under certain conditions, for instance Patterson's curse is often valued as food for honeybees and as a wildflower, even though it can poison livestock.
The term "plant pest" has a very specific definition in terms of the International Plant Protection Convention and phytosanitary measures worldwide. A pest is any species, strain or biotype of plant, animal, or pathogenic agent injurious to plants or plant products.[3]
Plants may be considered pests if an invasive species. Any prolific animal or plant may be considered pests.
The greatest importance as pests (in the order of economic importance) are insectsmitesnematodes and gastropods.[4]

Invertebrate pests

Insects


Caterpillars cause crop damage

Termites cause structural damage

Nematodes[edit]

Parasites[edit]

Gastropods[edit]

Some slugs are pests in both agriculture and gardens. Their significance is increasing drastically.[4] Deroceras reticulatum is a worldwide distributed slug pest.[4] Local importance slug pests include: Deroceras spp.,[4] Milax spp.,[4] Tandonia sp.,[4] Limax spp.,[4] Arion spp.[4] and some species ofVeronicellidae:[4] Veronicella sloanei.[5]
Land snail pests include:
Freshwater snail pests include:

Plant pathogens

Plant pests

Seagulls steal human food

Mammals

Birds