Showing posts with label Rodents. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Rodents. Show all posts

Wednesday, 23 December 2015

Mouse Control: How to Get Rid of Mice


Read this article at: http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/mice.htm

Inspect: The first step in controlling mice is to inspect feeding areas and exclude mice by closing entry access points.
Look for mice tracks, mice droppings and other rodent signs.
Click here : Inpecting for Mice Activity for more information.
Sanitation: If possible, get rid of human and pet food sources that the mice may be feeding. Enclose the food in tight fitting containers. Kitchen floors, sinks and counter tops need to be kept clean.
Read section on Sanitation as well; it is an important consideration in mouse control. Mice may contaminate food supply and carry diseases.

Exclusion: Look for openings that the mice can enter your home. They can enter through cracks in foundations, floors or walls. A mouse can fit through a vey tiny opening due to their soft cartilages. They can also squeeze through small gaps around utility lines and drainage pipes. All openings greater that 1/4" should be sealed to exclude mice. It may be difficult to find all openings since mice can enter through such small openings.
For more information, exclusion tips will help detect possible entry points.
Mouse Control: After inspecting for signs of mice activity, set mouse traps or place mouse bait in the detected areas.
Setting mice traps or placing out mouse bait are the most trustworthy methods of controlling mice populations.

Mouse Control Methods : Baiting and Trapping

Get Rid Of Mice By Trapping

Reducing Mice Population By Baiting

Trapping provides some advantages over using rodent baits.
The top advantage of trapping is being able to locate the dead rodent instead of a decomposing corpse.
The next advantage is not having poison baits in the area.
Rodenticides are poison baits and should be used in areas where domestic animals and children can't reach.
Use resistant -tamper bait stations that hold the baits in place and keep children and pets out. It is a national law and guideline to use resistant-tamper proof bait stations in areas where children or pets could access.
We carry single feeding bait (requires just one feeding for a lethal dose.
The baits come in pellets, meal, blox or block forms.

Tuesday, 7 January 2014

Mike Holmes: When the mice move in

Mice are known to eat away at batt insulation, including rigid foam.
HandoutMice are known to eat away at batt insulation, including rigid foam.
A lot of homeowners might be starting to notice some unwanted guests. No, not the in-laws. I’m talking about pests, and mice in particular.

Cold weather drives most animals and insects to find warmth, which could lead them straight to your house. And if they find a food source, they’re moving in.

What are the signs that you have mice? Mouse droppings. Little bits of chewed-up food packages. You might also be able to hear them in your walls or ceiling. They lurk in the cellar, the garage, pantry, kitchen — even bedrooms.

It takes just one mouse to make most people feel uncomfortable in their homes. And I don’t blame them.

Mice are known to carry diseases, bacteria, viruses and parasites. Breathing in small particles from their droppings, urine, saliva or nesting materials can make you sick. The particles can get into the air when you sweep or vacuum. That’s why you’re supposed to spray any area where mice have been with a disinfectant. It helps keep the particles from flying around, and then you can sweep or vacuum (remember to wear a disposable mask and gloves).

Mice can also contaminate surfaces in your home with their saliva or urine, which is almost impossible to detect. Next thing you know you could be drinking from a pop can that has mouse urine on the lid.

Some people might think that a couple of mice isn’t a big deal. But two mice in your home can do a lot of damage. In just six months, two mice can eat four pounds of food and leave 18,000 droppings. Plus, mice multiply fast. One female can have five to 10 litters of about five or six mice a year. Then those mice can start reproducing after only 30 days. Within three months six mice can multiply into 60. So if you’ve found one, there are probably more.

The worst part is the risk of contamination. Mice contaminate about 10 times more food than they eat.

These rodents are also destructive. They can chew through electrical wires and cause an electrical fire. They’ve been known to destroy rigid foam and fiberglass batt insulation. They can also gnaw through any wood in your home, including furniture, trim, cabinets, doors, even your home’s structure. Repairing all the damage they cause can be very expensive. And if you’re thinking of selling your home, a pest problem is usually a deal breaker.

How do you get rid of them?

I’ve heard of people using electrical devices that emit sound to get rid of mice. They usually don’t work. At first such a device might have an effect, but eventually mice get used to it.
Poisons aren’t always effective either. Plus, it’s a risk if you have pets; they could eat the poison or a poisoned dead mouse. When mice are poisoned they usually die somewhere inaccessible, like in a wall. It won’t be long before you start to notice a foul smell. And then how are you going to get a dead mouse out of your wall?

If you’re serious about getting rid of these critters for good, you need to call a professional. You don’t want to risk an infestation.

An experienced pest control professional can find where the mice are coming in. They’ll check for cracks and spaces around vents, wires, pipes, windows and doors. Then they’ll block their entry with mesh wiring, wood or spray foam insulation, or both.

Next, clean your house — including the garage and basement. Get rid of any clutter and trash. Mice love messy places, which make it easy for them to hide and nest. Store all food sources in sealed containers, including pet food.

To help stop mice from coming in, place weatherstripping around your doors; as a bonus, this will also increase energy efficiency. If your house has a chimney, get a chimney cap installed. Keep compost far from your home. Also move any firewood or mulch from around your home’s exterior. These are excellent places for mice to hide in.

All mice need is a little crack in a wall or foundation to get in. A sealed home is the only way to stop the problem. It’s also the most effective and humane. So check your home annually for cracks where mice can sneak in.

Catch Mike Holmes in his new series, Holmes Makes It Right, Tuesdays at 9 p.m. on HGTV.
For more information, visit hgtv.ca. For more information on home renovations, visit makeitright.ca.

Wednesday, 9 October 2013

List of common household pests

Invertebrates

Mammals

Birds

Reptiles

Thursday, 3 October 2013

Pests that require Control!

Pest (organism)



Carpet beetle larvae damaging a specimen of Sceliphron destillatorius in an entomological collection
pest is "a plant or animal detrimental to humans or human concerns (as agriculture or livestock production)";[1] alternative meanings include organisms that cause nuisance and epidemic disease associated with high mortality (specifically: plague). In its broadest sense, a pest is a competitor of humanity.[2] In the past, the term might have been used for detrimental animals only, thus for example, causing confusion where the generic term 'pesticide' meant 'insecticide' to some people. It is any living organism which is invasive or prolific, detrimental, troublesome, noxious, destructive, a nuisance to either plants or animals, human or human concerns, livestock, human structures, wild ecosystems, etc. It is a loosely defined term, often overlapping with the related terms vermin, weed, plant and animal parasites and pathogens. It is possible for an organism to be a pest in one setting but beneficial, domesticated or acceptable in another.[edit]

Pests often occur in high densities, making the damage they do even more detrimental
Often animals are derided as pests as they cause damage to agriculture by feeding on crops or parasitising livestock, such as codling moth on apples, orboll weevil on cotton. An animal could also be a pest when it causes damage to a wild ecosystem or carries germs within human habitats. Examples of these include those organisms which vector human disease, such as rats and fleas which carry the plague disease, mosquitoes which vector malaria, and ticks which carry Lyme disease.
The term pest may be used to refer specifically to harmful animals but is also often taken to mean all harmful organisms including weeds, plant pathogenic fungi and virusesPesticides are chemicals and other agents (e.g. beneficial micro-organisms) that are used to control or protect other organisms from pests. The related term vermin has much overlap with pest, but generally only includes those creatures that are seen to be vectors of diseases.
It is possible for an animal to be a pest in one setting but beneficial or domesticated in another (for example, European rabbits introduced to Australiacaused ecological damage beyond the scale they inflicted in their natural habitat). Many weeds (plant pests) are also seen as useful under certain conditions, for instance Patterson's curse is often valued as food for honeybees and as a wildflower, even though it can poison livestock.
The term "plant pest" has a very specific definition in terms of the International Plant Protection Convention and phytosanitary measures worldwide. A pest is any species, strain or biotype of plant, animal, or pathogenic agent injurious to plants or plant products.[3]
Plants may be considered pests if an invasive species. Any prolific animal or plant may be considered pests.
The greatest importance as pests (in the order of economic importance) are insectsmitesnematodes and gastropods.[4]

Invertebrate pests

Insects


Caterpillars cause crop damage

Termites cause structural damage

Nematodes[edit]

Parasites[edit]

Gastropods[edit]

Some slugs are pests in both agriculture and gardens. Their significance is increasing drastically.[4] Deroceras reticulatum is a worldwide distributed slug pest.[4] Local importance slug pests include: Deroceras spp.,[4] Milax spp.,[4] Tandonia sp.,[4] Limax spp.,[4] Arion spp.[4] and some species ofVeronicellidae:[4] Veronicella sloanei.[5]
Land snail pests include:
Freshwater snail pests include:

Plant pathogens

Plant pests

Seagulls steal human food

Mammals

Birds