Thursday, 8 August 2013

Seasonal Pest Control

When the seasons change, so do the pests that come with them. For information, please continue reading below.
Here are some of the pests that may show up during the different seasons in Ontario.

Paper wasps are 0.7 to 1.0 inch (1.8 to 2.5 cm)-long wasps that gather fibers from dead wood and plant stems, which they mix with saliva, and use to construct water-resistant nests made of gray or brown papery material. Paper wasps are also sometimes called umbrella wasps, due to the distinctive design of their nests[1] or other regional variants such as Trinidad & Tobago’s use of Jack Spaniard.[2]
Paper wasps like to stay in the attic during the winter months and/or walls, and they re-appear during the intial warm day period in March or April, staying until late fall.

Carpenter ants are large (.25 to 1 in/0.64 to 2.5 cm) ants indigenous to many parts of the world. They prefer dead, damp wood in which to build nests. They do not eat it, however, unlike termites.[1] Sometimes carpenter ants will hollow out sections of trees. The most likely species to be infesting a house in the United States is the black carpenter ant (Camponotus pennsylvanicus). However, there are over a thousand other species in the genus Camponotus.
Carpenter ants are more active during early spring inside the home, and sometimes continue into the summer. Look for them on the outside of your home, near trees and/or shrubs.

The Little Black Ant (Monomorium minimum) is a species of ant. Members of the species are tiny and shiny black in color. These ants are usually found outdoors or in wood inside a home that causes it to decay.
Workers are 1/16 inch in length and the queens are 1/8 inch in length. Also the Soldiers are 1/13 of an inch in length. There may be 100, 000 in one colony. They use recruitment to deal more effectively with large prey. They form colonies with multiple queens.
Ants give birth to live pupa. Ant pupa laid by the queen can take just 10 days to mature. Winged ants may fly away and start a new colony if the current colony is overpopulated.
Small ants are one of the most common problems we come across in the Summer. They often stay outside of the home in gardens and patio stone walkways.
Carpenter bees (the genus Xylocopa in the subfamily Xylocopinae) are large bees distributed worldwide. There are some 500 species of carpenter bee in 31 subgenera.[1] Their name comes from the fact that nearly all species build their nests in burrows in dead wood, bamboo, or structural timbers (except those in the subgenus Proxylocopa, which nest in the ground). Members of the related tribe Ceratinini are sometimes referred to as “small carpenter bees”.
Carpenter bees show up in the Spring and stay around well into the summer. Infestations cause woodpeckers to poke holes into trees attempting to eat the larvae. This damage is serious and harms the trees.
Mud dauber (sometimes called “dirt dauber,” “dirt digger,” “dirt dobber,” “dirt diver”, or “mud wasp”) is a name commonly applied to a number of wasps from either the family Sphecidae or Crabronidae that build their nests from mud. Mud dauber may refer to any of the following common species:
Mud dauber wasps are around all summer long. They like to be around water, shrubs, bush, and flowers to hunt for caterpillars and spiders. They can build up into large numbers around your home, although not usually aggressive.

Yellowjacket is the common name in North America for predatory wasps of the genera Vespula and Dolichovespula. Members of these genera are known simply as “wasps” in other English-speaking countries. Most of these are black and yellow; some are black and white (such as the bald-faced hornet, Dolichovespula maculata), while others may have the abdomen background color red instead of black. They can be identified by their distinctive markings, small size (similar to a honey bee), their occurrence only in colonies, and a characteristic, rapid, side to side flight pattern prior to landing. All females are capable of stinging. Yellowjackets are important predators of pest insects.[1]
Yellow Jackets start in the Spring and are easy to treat early. By late summer or fall however, they are more difficult to deal with.
A mouse (plural: mice) is a small mammal belonging to the order of rodents, characteristically having a pointed snout, small rounded ears, and a long naked or almost hairless tail. The best known mouse species is the common house mouse (Mus musculus). It is also a popular pet. In some places, certain kinds of field mice are also common. This rodent is eaten by large birds such as hawks and eagles. They are known to invade homes for food and occasionally shelter.
Mice are an issue more so in the Summer, gaining access to the home through the garage or attic.

The mosquitoes are a family of small, midge-like flies: the Culicidae. Although a few species are harmless or even useful to humanity, most are a nuisance because they consume blood from living vertebrates, including humans. In feeding on blood, various species of mosquitoes transmit some of the most harmful human and livestock diseases. Some authorities argue accordingly that mosquitoes are the most dangerous animals on earth.[2]
Mosquitoes come in waves, usually initially in the Spring, then the summer. The number of them depends on the temperature and rainfall.

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